© 2016 by Heewon Lee All Rights Reserved.

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Spatiotemporality: Sukkha Project 

2013  |  Seoul, S. Korea

As the Sukkah commemorates (Jewish Ceremony) the temporary shelter that the Israelites lived while they were wandering the desert for forty years after their exodus from Egypt, our sukkah is reimagining the traditional notion as present state of our world which contemporary people are living like wandering the unstable and rapidly changing nomadic world with an unconscious desire for the permanence. During this Jewish ritual observance, by reinterpreting the period of wandering the desert in our urban environment, the structure becomes a mediated space between the transience and permanence of life through time and space creating a spatiotemporal moment.

 

When one enters to the sukkah, the vertically arrayed strings (garden twine) blur his sight towards the external human-made existences in the city and redefine his bodily perception to the sky stimulating inner realm of his imagination. While one’s surrounding existences are visually decertified by the vertical layers, this momentary experience reflects the period while Israelites were wandering the desert relying on the sky physically and mentally.

 

From the outside of the structure, the sukkah brings the sense of wonder providing a reversed illusion that the weak strings (garden twine) are sustained by itself supporting the roof slab as a structural façade. By blending both weak and solid materials, the sukkah reflects the contrasted and coexisting perception of temporality and permanence in human’s life.

 

The structural system that we are proposing uses arraying strings (garden twine) that are vertically suspended between plywood slabs. The wood columns covered by mirrored sheets (chrome film) contribute to creating an illusion to blur its existence by reflecting the surrounding strings. Increasing the string layers and narrowing the distances among strings towards the center of the structure, the weak strings are transformed to intensify the enclosure of the sukkah. The openness and closeness of the enclosure are varied by every location while both are coexisting.